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Archive for diciembre 2019

I have been wondering what the connection between people, especially old people, and a resilient society could be.

What is more resilient than an old person? They have demonstrated their resilience through the years. An 80 or 90 year old European has gone through at least one war, if not several if he or she is from one of those unfortunate countries (the Balkans, Ukraine, …) which have suffered also their own national wars.

And yet, when devising processes for a resilient society, we do not look to those generations that have proved to be resilient. What have they done to survive in such an unwelcome surrounding?

My answer is simple: adaptation.

I had a teacher in high school who provided an easy explanation for the difference between democracy and dictatorship. Dictatorship is like a concrete wall; it withstands high winds but if the wind grows strong enough it collapses and disappears. Democracy is like a wall made up of a sheet of paper; it bents with the wind and, when the wind does not blow anymore, it falls back in place. That is adaptation.

Going back to how to design for old age or for resilient societies, I think we should look at the same characteristic: adaptation. We will survive if we can adapt ourselves and our society to a changing world, be it new technologies or climate change.

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We all are moving fast. The baby-boomers (1946-1964) are coming of age … retirement age. If the silent generation (1920-1945) was the generation that absorbed the car and the telephone as routine communication tools, we would expect the baby-boomers to take information and communication technology (ICT) as their routine communication channel.

That is the case and, when dealing with today’s problems, the expectation becomes a truism. We all jump into using ICT to solve many of the aging problems that baby-boomers encounter. And, as it happens, this is the view that the European Commission holds: ICT is here to solve the ageing problem.

If we take the use of internet as a yardstick, the reality is that only 45% of the +65s use internet once a week or more in Europe. Descending to country level, the differences are striking: in Norway that figure is 82% and 12% in Bulgaria.

So, should we jump from analogic to digital in the blink of an eye or are we going to find the swimming pool empty? Wouldn’t it be more realistic to work on long-term structural change from analogic to digital transition, similar to the energy transition favored by the UN in the current COP25?

A transition of that kind will ensure that nobody will be left behind, a very important factor when we are talking about 55% of the +65s Europeans.

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