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Posts Tagged ‘IoT’

Human beings are more or less worried about the use other people could make of their data. From Mr. Trump to the little guy on the corner, everybody is aware that their data, their activity, is being recorded and exploited by somebody somewhere: people with good intentions and people with not so good intentions.

To be honest, the fact that Amazon records my purchases so that it can send me what their algorithm decides I like is not a concern for me. Little does the algorithm know that I buy mostly for my wife, so I get inundated with the things my wife probably wants.

But what about health related issues? The EU has issued, and most countries have adopted, a very sensitive legislation about how to treat health data. The problem arises when, thanks to IoT, a myriad of data is recorded that is not strictly health data. Data that is not sensitive in  isolation; for instance how much I walk, how much time I spend in front of the  TV, if I go or  to the bathroom or not, or if I wet my bed. All of those examples are indicators of my health status. All those indicators are gathered and recorded by unobtrusive sensors imbedded in my wrist-band, in my sofa, in the door to the bathroom, or in my mattress. All of them form part of the IoT. Are those sensors hacker-proof? Stand-alone information from any of those sensors is meaningless, but the combined information of all of them makes sense.

Now I can start worrying about what Amazon and others are gathering from my activity. If somebody puts that information together and adds the information from the many possible sensors I may end up having at home, that organization is going to know more about me than I care for them to know.

Summing up, we should be aware that there is no such thing as an innocent sensor. Before adopting the newest gadget, we should be aware that we may be broadcasting our information to the world. The choice to do so is ours (as a matter of fact the smartphone, adopted gladly by almost everybody, is the biggest – so far – recorder/transmitter of our information) but we should be aware of it and make an informed decision so as not to be sorry later.

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If you come across anybody who has not heard of Internet of Things (IoT) be careful, the person surely comes from another planet. IoT is at the centre of any ICT research. Everybody is developing devices, claiming that these will interconnect to anything you already have or will have.

And yet, at home we still have several remote controls for our smart TV, for recording devices, and for the all present black box that allows us to enjoy hours of the most degrading TV shows. Of course, the sound system runs under another completely different set of remote controls: for the CD player, the tuner, not to mention the necessary turntable that we have brought to life again after having been convinced that the sound is a lot more natural on an analogic record than in a digitalized CD.

IoT’s promise is that all our gadgets will be interconnected inside our homes and even with the exterior. A different problem is whether I really want my fridge to send messages to my grocery store to replace that uneatable marmalade that my daughter in law gave me and that I have been struggling to finish for the past two months.

Although the promise is great, reality strikes back. As of today, only 6% of American households have a smart-home device, and 72% of Britons have no plans to adopt smart-home technology in the near future (The Economist 11.06.2016). Of course it does not help that some of the smart gadgets like the Samsung´s smart fridge goes for almost $ 6,000.

IoT marketing is probably missing the point, as has been the case in many new ICT developments. Putting the focus on the ICT novelty will not attract people. Unless the smart-home gadget solves a real problem, it is difficult to convince people to adapt it. Technology is available today for doing almost anything that anybody can think of. The problem is the generational divide. Young people full of energy devise new things that are meant for older people maybe two or even three generations apart. Have they asked those people what they really need? Have they participated in every phase of the development?

Just as a marker, go to the pictures of any of the ICT gatherings in the world and try to spot anybody older than 65. Even those gatherings especially dedicated to ageing, like the yearly AAL Forum which I have attended many years, are packed with young people full of ideas that will be tested on older people just because the rules say so, not really because they feel like it.

And then we come to the pure ICT problem of interconnectivity. It is essential to develop a common standard to allow seamless connectivity among gadgets from different makers. From what I know, that is being done more or less for industrial IoT, but something similar for the domestic domain is lacking.

In all, my bet is that IoT as something integrated in everyday life is a long way off. Only a concerted effort to develop an overall global standardisation, coupled with real intergeneration symbiosis, will bring forward the realization of the home IoT.

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