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Posts Tagged ‘resilience’

I have been wondering what the connection between people, especially old people, and a resilient society could be.

What is more resilient than an old person? They have demonstrated their resilience through the years. An 80 or 90 year old European has gone through at least one war, if not several if he or she is from one of those unfortunate countries (the Balkans, Ukraine, …) which have suffered also their own national wars.

And yet, when devising processes for a resilient society, we do not look to those generations that have proved to be resilient. What have they done to survive in such an unwelcome surrounding?

My answer is simple: adaptation.

I had a teacher in high school who provided an easy explanation for the difference between democracy and dictatorship. Dictatorship is like a concrete wall; it withstands high winds but if the wind grows strong enough it collapses and disappears. Democracy is like a wall made up of a sheet of paper; it bents with the wind and, when the wind does not blow anymore, it falls back in place. That is adaptation.

Going back to how to design for old age or for resilient societies, I think we should look at the same characteristic: adaptation. We will survive if we can adapt ourselves and our society to a changing world, be it new technologies or climate change.

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Either because it is mandatory or out of the realization that a disaster, natural or manmade, can put the soundest enterprise out of business, almost all big companies have a Business Continuity Plan (BCP) for proper Disaster Risk Management (DRM). Is it the same for SMEs? I am afraid it is not the case.

I have written before about how individuals should take control of their own safety. This post is an extension of the need for SMEs to be an active part of a disaster resilient society.

So far, I haven’t been able to identify too many actions directed at helping SMEs implement actions enabling them to be prepared for a disaster. As a matter of fact, according to a paper by Juan Pablo Sarmiento et al of the University of Florida (USA), only 14,1% of business with fewer than 100 employees had a BCP in place (2013). The recent flooding in south-east Spain, one of the vegetable gardens of Europe, has shown that only 37% of the 50,000 damaged hectares have something as simple as an insurance policy, let alone a BCP.

Are we going to do anything about it? If we look at the last issue of the H2020 WP in Security, this is something that has not even been contemplated, except for cybersecurity risks. Do we assume that SMEs are not an important part of society? This is not the case. According to Eurostat, SMEs provide 66,3% of the employment in EU28, approximately 137 million people. Imagine if we could get 137 million people involved in a resilient society? Imagine if we could get 99,8% of the total number of enterprises involved in a resilient society?

Maybe it is worth a try.

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Certainly we are living in interesting times. My first “serious” job was as Administrator of the Computing Centre at the Complutense University of Madrid. The centre was equipped with an IBM 360 which had a main memory smaller than my actual smart phone. So here we are, equipped with a powerful hand held instrument that, most of us, use for calling/texting friends and acquaintances, listening to music or watching TV shows. What a waste!

So, people around the world are trying to introduce us to the wonders of apps: smart little pieces of programming that are intended to make life easier for us. From advising us when the next bus is coming to how to navigate those streets we are not familiar with.

But there is another use that is being explored and promoted but still is not part of our lives. I am talking about those apps that are intended to change our lives. According to a recent report (mHealth App Economics 2017 http://www.research2guidance.com) there are some 350.000 health apps on the market. I have not found a similar study for other sectors, for example managing disasters, but a Google search for it gives 262 results, so it is not a fringe issue either.

Anyhow, the fact is that be it 350.000 or 262, the spread of those apps is meaningless. Do you know anybody in your circle using one app for a practical use in health or in security? I do not and I am closely involved with the socio-health sector, and have some connection with security issues.

The only possible conclusion is that the business model on which those apps rely are faulty. Most of them are built thinking of the future, a user that does not exist, either because the app is too complicated or because it is too simple. We are simply forgetting about user-centered co-design. We design things for the user but not with the user. Let´s try in 2018 to change our design mainframe and put the user in the centre of our efforts. That will make our times even more interesting.

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