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Posts Tagged ‘riyadh declaration’

The Riyadh Declaration on Digital Health articulated seven priorities and nine recommendations to be adopted by the health community. Even though Covid-19 has been an accelerator of the adoption of ICT tools applied to the health sector, a deficit in the widespread adoption of digital tools to foster a better healthcare persists.

Of course, out of the 7+9 we could choose many culprits for the situation. But to me there are two recommendations that are the core of the problem:

Number 6: Cultivate a health and care workforce with the knowledge, skills, and training in data and digital technologies required to address current and future public health challenges

Number 8: Develop digital personal tools and services to support comprehensive health programmes (in disease prevention, testing, management, and vaccination) globally

Both recommendations focus on people; one on the healthcare professional, the other on the citizen. Both groups are eHealth users, and both groups are normally forgotten by the developer. The basic problem is the existence of a generation gap. Most ICT developers are millennials, the kind of person who, like somebody I was with yesterday, thinks that a 40-year-old person is “old”. They are not willing to pay attention to the reality of demographics. If they invested some minutes to the study of today’s demographics, they would discover that one third of healthcare workers are over 50, and that one fifth of the EU-27 population is over 65 (see Training for ICTs).

The point is that developers should have users in mind. I know that, at least in EU funded projects, it is a requirement to take end-users into the equation. And I know that efforts are made by the developing consortia to involve them. But the problem exists, and it exists because the process of getting an ICT application into the market starts with the ICT developer dreaming of a solution to a problem that the developer has identified, and then looking for an end user that fits the dream.

The correct process should have been, and very seldom is, for the end user to dream about solving his or her problem, and then identify the ICT developer that fulfils the dream. As you can see, the end user should be the driver of the process, not the back-seat passenger in the development vehicle. Acting this way will make it easier for ICT to reach its true potential.

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